Canning Recipes

Looking for new ways to try out your canning skills? Here are some recipes we’ve been making. For a complete canning how-to, check out our posts Canning 101 and Canning 201, or download our guide How to Can Your Harvest.

RHUBARB KETCHUP

4 cups rhubarb, diced
2 med onion, diced
3/4 cup cider vinegar
3/4 cup packed brown sugar
3/4 cup cane sugar
1 can tomato – 28 oz
1 tsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon
1 Tbsp pickling spice

Prepare canner, jars and lids. In a large stainless steel saucepan, combine all ingredients. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat and boil gently, stirring frequently, until mixture is thickened to a nice ketchup-type consistency, about 25 minutes.

Ladle hot sauce into hot jars, leaving ½ inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary, by adding hot sauce. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar, screw band down until resistance is met, then increase to fingertip-tight. Place jars in canner, ensuring they are completely covered with water. Bring to a boil and process for 15 minutes. Remove canner lid. Wait 5 minutes, then remove jars, cool and store.

PICKLED BEETS

6 lbs beets
1 1/3 cups sugar
2 tsp pickling or canning salt
4 cups white vinegar
2 cups water

Trim the end of beets and place in large pot with water. Bring water to boil, and reduce heat and boil for 40 minutes or until tender, but not too soft (fork can poke through). In the meantime, prepare canner, jars and lids (sterilize).

Place beets in bowl with cold water and let cool off for approximately 30 minutes. Peel skins – they should slide off easily once cooled, and chop into bite-size pieces. In a large pot, combine vinegar, salt, sugar, and water and bring to a boil over medium/high heat. Stir often until sugar has dissolved. Add beets and return to a boil for one minute –then remove from heat.

Pack beets into jars, leaving about 1 inch (2.5 cm) head space. Pour hot pickling liquid and remove air bubbles. Wipe rim with clean dish cloth and white vinegar or paper towel. Place lid on jar. Screw to fingertip tight. Place jars in canner (or hot water bath) and return to a boil. Process in hot water bath for 30 minutes. Remove from canner and let stand for 24 hours. You should hear a ‘pop’ shortly after they are removed. This, along with a visual check that the seal is curved downward, confirms a good seal.

Tip: Try swapping white vinegar with apple cider vinegar, and sugar with honey. If you don’t want to go through the full water bath canning process, you can use less sugar but they will need to be refrigerated immediately and will only last for a couple months versus one year.

PEACH AND JALAPEÑO SALSA
Adapted from The Complete Book of Pickling by Jennifer MacKenzie
Makes about 10 250ml jars or 5 500ml jars

10 cups of finely chopped and peeled peaches
2 cups finely chopped onions
1 1/2 cups finely chopped red or yellow bell peppers
1/4 cup minced seed jalapeño peppers
3 cloves of garlic, minced
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 1/2 tsp pickling salt
1 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1 cup white vinegar
2 Tbsp chopped fresh cilantro (mint can be substituted for non-cilantro lovers)

Prepare canner, jars and lids. In a large pot, combine peaches, onions, red peppers, jalapeños, garlic, sugar, salt cumin, cinnamon and vinegar. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring often. Reduce heat and boil gently, stirring often, for about 20 minutes or until onions are translucent and salsa is slightly thickened. Stir in fresh herbs.

Ladle hot salsa into hot pint jars, leaving 1/2 inch headspace as necessary by adding hot salsa. Wipe rim and place hot lid disc on jar. Screw band down until fingertip-tight. Place jars in canner and return to a boil. Process for 20 minutes.

ZESTY PEACH BARBECUE SAUCE
Adapted from the Bernardin Complete Book of Home Preserving
Makes about 8-250ml jars

6 cups finely chopped, pitted and peeled peaches
1 cup finely chopped seeded red bell pepper
1 cup finely chopped onion
3 Tbsp finely chopped garlic (approx. 6 cloves)
1 1/4 liquid honey
3/4 cup cider vinegar
1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
2 Tbsp chipotle chilies in adobe sauce, chopped fine (or substitute 2 tsp hot
pepper flakes)
2 tsp dry mustard
2 tsp salt

Prepare canner, jars and lids. In a large stainless steel saucepan, combine all ingredients. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat and boil gently, stirring frequently, until mixture is thickened to the consistency of a thin commercial barbecue sauce, about 25 minutes.

Ladle hot sauce into hot jars, leaving ½ inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary, by adding hot sauce. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar, Screw band down until resistance is met, then increase to fingertip-tight. Place jars in canner, ensuring they are completely covered with water. Bring to a boil and process for 15 minutes. Remove canner lid. Wait 5 minutes, then remove jars, cool and store.

TOMATILLO AND LIME SALSA VERDE
From The Complete Book of Pickling by Jennifer MacKenzie

12 cups chopped tomatillos (approx. 4 lbs)
3 cups chopped onions
4 finely chopped and seeded jalapeno peppers
1/4 cup finely chopped garlic (about 12 cloves)
4 tsp pickling salt
1 cup white vinegar
1 tsp grated lime zest
1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Prepare canner, jars and lids. In a large pot, combine tomatillos, onions, jalapenos, garlic, salt, vinegar and lime juice. Bring to a boil over medium high heat, stirring often. Reduce heat and boil gently, stirring often, for about 20 minutes or until tomatillos and onions are tender and salsa is slightly thickened. Stir in lime zest and cilantro.

Ladle hot salsa into hot jars, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace as necessary by adding hot salsa. Wipe rim and place hot lid disc on jar. Screw band down until fingertip-tight. Place jars in canner and return to a boil. Process for 15 minutes before removing to a towel-lined surface and let stand until completely cool. Refrigerate any jars that are not sealed.

SPICED HONEY PEACHES
From Bernardin
Makes about 6 pint jars

1 cup granulated sugar
4 cups water
2 cups liquid honey
8 lbs small peaches, peeled, halved, pitted and drained
6 cinnamon sticks
3/4 tsp whole cloves

Prepare canner, jars and lids. In a large stainless steel saucepan, combine sugar, water and honey. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Reduce heat to low, add peaches one layer at a time and warm until heated through, about 3 minutes per layer.

Using a slotted spoon, pack hot peaches, cavity side down, into hot jars to within a generous 1/2 inch of top of jar. Add 1 cinnamon stick and 2 cloves to each jar. Ladle hot syrup into jar to cover peaches, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary, by adding hot syrup. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar. Screw band down until resistance is met, then increase to fingertip-tight. Place jars in canner, ensuring they are completely covered with water. Bring to a boil and process for 25 minutes. Remove jars, cool and store.

Variation: For a different flavour, substitute 1 large star anise or several cardamom pods for the other spices – or simply leave it plain.

CANNED PEACHES – HOT PACK
Yield: 7 pint (500 mL) jars
28-30 peaches

Pour boiling water over fruit and let sit 30 seconds. Drain hot water, dip briefly in cold water and slip off skins. Remove pit, and cut fruit into quarters. To prevent discoloration as the fruit is prepared, put in a solution of ¼ cup lemon juice and 4 cups water.

Prepare a medium syrup according to Syrup Table (see below). Drain fruit and add to hot syrup. Bring to a boil. Immediately remove fruit with a slotted spoon and fill hot, sterilized jars leaving 3/4 inch (2 cm) headspace. Cover fruit with boiling syrup. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace to 1/2 inch (1 cm).

Wipe rims. Put on snap lids and screw bands. Process pint (500 mL) jars for 20 minutes in boiling water bath and quart (1 L) jars for 25 minutes.

Tips for peeling and pitting peaches: I find it easiest to pit first, as the fuzzy skin gives you something to hold onto. If you peel first, they are really slippery. Slice the peach from stem to tip all the way around. Hold one side in each hand and twist. The peach should split nicely in half. Cut the side with the pit in half and pop out the pit. Place halves and quarters into a bowl and pour boiling water over them. Let sit for about a minute, and then transfer peaches into a bowl of cold water using a slotted spoon. The skins should now peel off easily.

SYRUP TABLE:

Type of SyrupSugarWaterSuitable Fruits
Very Light½ cup5 cupsPears
Light1 ¼ cups4 ½ cupsPears, sweet cherries, apples, blueberries
Medium1 ¾ cups4 cupsPeaches, nectarines, plums, apricots, raspberries, tart apples, sour cherries, gooseberries
Heavy2 ½ cups4 cupsRhubarb

And here are some tips on using your preserves:

– Spread some savoury chutney over the bottom of a pita and layer thinly sliced fresh veggies on top. Sprinkle some walnuts and goat cheese over the top and broil until veggies begin to get tender. In summer you could use thinly sliced zucchini, but a mixture of grated carrots, onions and parsnips would taste good too!

– Haddock fillets cooked in parchment paper with lemon and butter is even tastier with fennel zucchini relish spread over the fish before packaging it all up for the oven. When it’s cooked, add a little more relish for serving at the table.

– Make some fancy appetizers! A good rule of thumb is that any kind of chutney generally tastes great with any type of soft cheese. Try topping a baked brie with cranberry chutney, or making some phyllo pastry stuffed with goat cheese and blueberry chutney.

– Couscous is a super quick side dish, but it can be a bit bland on its own. Try adding some sauteed veggies and a bit of chutney for an exotic pilaf.

Updated from posts originally published in 2011, 2013 and 2016

2 thoughts on “Canning Recipes

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